Posts Tagged With: benefits

What is Diatomaceous Earth?

DEDiatomaceous Earth

The uses and healthy effects of Diatomaceous Earth in powder form (or DE) reaches back more than 5,000 years to ancient China where it became part of traditional Chinese Medicine. Some use it as an additive to stored grain to keep it bug free and to stretch flour stores while other health-conscious individuals use it as an alternative to commonly used chemicals to grow and strengthen the hair, develop elasticity in the skin, harden the bones, and promote general well-being. In an Australian study, DE was found to lower blood cholesterol in humans. It is also an excellent source of plant derived silica. Adding diatomaceous earth to your diet can rid the body of parasites that can contribute to food intolerance, nausea, bowel discomfort, pain, itching, asthma, sinus infections, Morgellon’s disease, and a host of other allergic-type reactions. Initially, you may experience a Herxhemier reaction (The Jarisch-Herxheimer Reaction is a reaction to endotoxins released by the death of harmful organisms within the body), which can cause abdominal discomfort and flu-like symptoms. This is a normal response to detoxing, as parasites and pathogens die, releasing their toxins into your system for elimination. The symptoms disappear after a few days.

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Diatomaceous Earth is also the best natural chelating product available and can used to detoxify the body of mercury, cadmium, lead and other heavy metals, remove poisons from chem-trails, radiation, and may alleviate the effects of GMOs. There are literally hundreds of ways DE is beneficial to humans, animals and plant life alike. As a daily supplement, many believe that it’s most beneficial uses is for internal cleansing

by aiding in the elimination of intestinal parasites, which are not able to develop an immunity to the sharp edges of DE. It has been concluded that the drastic increase of heavy metal poisoning case has occurred in part due to fluoridated water, mercury in vaccines, aluminum based deodorants, particular varieties of seafood, foil wrapping, aluminum cookware, and who knows how many other ways.

Usage
Make sure you use only food-grade Diatomaceous Earth to detox. This ensures that the product has not been chemically treated. DE can be taken for a period of months or years depending on the desired effects. Individual dosages vary and are usually based on size and weight. Reports run the gamut between a heaping teaspoonful in a smoothie two to three times a week to a tablespoon each morning and evening with water. As with all new health routines, proceed cautiously. There can be health problems associated with evacuating too many parasites too quickly from your body.

Dissolve less than one teaspoon for every 100 pounds you weigh in a glass of pure water of about 8 – 10 fluid ounces and take it once a day. Other liquids can be used but don’t mix DE with citrus liquids insuring you avoid a gut reaction. Stir constantly as you drink, it as the substance does not dissolve easily. Drink plenty of pure water, juices and herbal teas throughout the day to help aid the detox process. When mixing your D.E., remember it is texture and weight, more than taste, that will pose the challenge to create a smooth mixture. D.E.’s taste is virtually undetectable, extremely bland, sometimes described as chalky. It is easy to whisk a teaspoon to a tablespoon into a small glass of water and chug it down. Expect a clay-like texture that varies in consistency depending on the amount of water you use. Try adding it to a blended drink. D.E. is similar in weight to protein powder and will mix easily into your blended concoction. Diatomaceous earth can be used in conjunction with other parasite cleanse products or on its own to maintain your system’s health.

Left: Angiostrongylus cantonensis third stage (L3), infective larva recovered from a slug. Image captured under differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. Right: Angiostrongylus adult worm recovered from vitreous humor of a human patient.

Increase the dosage of food-grade Diatomaceous Earth over a number of weeks until you gradually reach two tablespoons per day. This will

help prevent a reaction referred to as “healing crisis,” which can happen during the detox process as the body tries to get rid of toxins at a rate too fast to dispose of them.


Other Uses –
You may feel worse initially as you start the process, but that’s just a sign that the detox is working.

Household Pesticide
• Fill a gallon-sized plastic bag with food-grade diatomaceous earth. Close the bag and ensure that it is completely sealed. Pinch a corner of the bag and turn it upside down. Snip that end with a pair of scissors. Only cut off 1/6 to 1/8 of an inch to create a small hole.
• Turn the bag over and pour the diatomaceous earth out in a long line along the areas of your to be treated. Use along baseboards, along the backs of cupboards, behind the refrigerator, on windowsills and in any nooks or spaces where you have a pest problem. Diatomaceous earth is effective against household insects and bugs (cockroaches, ants, silverfish, etc.) but will not work on mice and rats. Wear protective eye goggles and a face mask while handling diatomaceous earth to avoid getting it in your eyes and lungs.
• Sprinkle diatomaceous earth on your carpets to kill fleas and ticks. Allow it to sit in the carpet for at least 24 to 48 hours in order to expose all pests to it and then vacuum it up with an ordinary vacuum cleaner.
• Dust diatomaceous earth on houseplants, around their pots and on top of the potted soil to control pests, such as spiders, aphids and ants.

In the Garden
• Create a 2- to 3 3/4-inch (about 5 cm to 7 cm) wide swath of food-grade diatomaceous earth around garden plants by using the baggie method to create a slug guard.
• Dust garden plants with diatomaceous earth after it has rained. Diatomaceous earth will not adhere to plants well unless they are slightly moist. You can spray your plants with a mister and then dust, or you can add diatomaceous earth to your sprayer and mix with water. This works well on pond plants and makes application simple. The diatomaceous earth will need to be reapplied after it rains. Minimize the destruction of beneficial insects by applying diatomaceous earth in the late afternoon or early evening when insect activity is lowest. Do not apply it excessively.
• Mix one part diatomaceous earth to five parts water with a few drops of dish soap in a spray bottle. Spray this mixture on the trunks of trees to kill off borers and bark-desiccating bugs.

Pet Care
• Mix 1/2 tsp. food-grade diatomaceous earth with your pets’ food (for smaller animals) and 1 tsp. for larger animals, once a day. Diatomaceous earth is believed to help control internal parasites, such as worms. Some pet foods already have diatomaceous earth mixed into them.
• Fill a salt shaker or flour duster with food-grade diatomaceous earth. Ensure that the ports are open so that it can flow freely.
• Dust your pets’ fur with diatomaceous earth, and rub it in to kill fleas and ticks. Avoid dusting in your pets’ eyes and face. One dusting should be enough to treat a short-haired animal, but a second dusting might be required for a pet with longer fur. Wash, dry and comb your pet prior to dusting. Keep your pet calm and on a leash for a few hours before allowing it to resume normal activity. Do not wash your pet for at least a week after an application.
• Apply diatomaceous earth to your pets’ bedding on both sides and around any of the areas where the pet may roam or rest. You can apply it to outside pens, if desired. Be careful not to expose beneficial insects to diatomaceous earth or they will be killed along with undesired pests.
• Diatomaceous earth for pond fish. Apply one cup per hundred gallons of water. This will help prevent parasite infestations of your fish. However it will also kill dragonfly larvae and other underwater insect pond life that you might want to keep.

You can buy Diatomaceous Earth in various places around the internet or you can buy the Uncooked DE Cleanse from the Uncooked Market.

I am not a doctor nor do I have any medical background. All information is presented for research purposes only and should not be substituted for the advice of a qualified health care professional.

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Categories: Breakdown, Practices, Question?, Raw | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Grass!!! Wheat & Barley Grass – What, Why & How

Wheat & Barley Grass

Young cereal grasses — like wheat and barley grass — are recognized by their bright emerald green colors. At the early grass stage of their growth, wheat and barley are closer to vegetables than grains in their make up. It isn’t until the wheat and barley plants mature that gluten is formed which is why the young grass is so much better for you than anything made with cooked wheat or barley products.

Many people include barley or wheat grass in their diet because of the wide variety of benefits, such as prevention of cancer, lower blood pressure and cholesterol and an expedited immune system response.

The use of barley grass for medicinal purposes dates back to 7,000 BC, when records first show that the grass was grown as a crop. It was then used to treat a variety of sicknesses, including blood and liver problems; it is said that ancient gladiators chewed on the grass to boost energy and stamina before fights. The understanding of barley grass benefits has evolved and can now be found in several forms.

High concentrations of chlorophyll—the green pigment found in some plants that gives the green food group its name—acts much like human blood’s oxygen carrier, hemoglobin. Chlorophyll inhibits the growth of disease bacteria when introduced into the diet, and this effect may create a wide array of barley grass benefits. Barley grass does away with atoms with an odd number of electrons created through normal body functions that can cause damage to healthy cells.

The nutrient profiles of these grasses changes quickly as they grow. As the plant grows, the chlorophyll, protein and vitamin content of cereal grasses declines sharply and the level of cellulose (indigestible fiber) increases. Over a period of several months, the green leafy cereal grasses become amber waves of grain bearing the kernels we harvest to make into unhealthy inflammation causing flour we are all accustomed to.

Barley vs. Wheat Grass

Some claim that barley grass is easier on the digestive system than wheat grass. Barley grass is also said to contain an exceptionally high amount of “organic sodium” and is known to alleviate arthritis symptoms more effectively than wheat grass juice.

However, there is no evidence that barley grass is any better or worse than wheatgrass in terms of its likelihood of producing adverse effects, its nutritional properties, or its health effects.

There is very little nutritional difference between wheat grass and barley grass, although it is important to note that barley grass acts as a free radical scavenger that also reduces inflammation and pain, and wheat grass is richer in inflammation reducing antioxidants. It is also thought to be able to help the body attack cancer cells.

ImageYou can get these two cereal grasses in powder or tablet form. The dried grasses are a bit easier to handle than fresh, which must be juiced. However, fresh grass juice contains healthful enzymes not found in dried grass powder and is likely to be higher in just about every phytochemical found in the grass. This is why numerous healthy food and specialty store around the world now offer grass shots on their menus.

With that said, not everybody can go out and spend $2.50 (on average) for a 1 or 2 ounce shot of wheat grass whenever they want which is why so many people are resorting to the practice of growing the grass fresh for themselves.

The Wheat & Barley Grass is always greener… Where you grow it!

Growing wheat and barley grass is the easiest and most affordable way to keep plenty of the super green food on hand.

Growing wheat and barley grasses at home is pretty simple and can be mastered easily by anybody who cares enough to try it. The technique starts like many other sprouts and once the seeds begin to show signs of growth it’s time to hit the soil!

First, place seeds in a large bowl. Cover completely with cool water (60 to 70 degrees F). Stir the seeds around in the water to mix. Let soak for about 8 to 12 hours or overnight.

Next, drain the seeds. Use a mesh colander or any other fine strainer you may have to keep the seeds from draining through the holes of the strainer. Rinse the seeds with cool water and drain.

After that, put the seeds in direct sunlight or where the temperature is about 70 degrees F for anywhere from 8 to 12 hours.

Then, rinse and drain the seeds again. Set out for another 8 to 12 hours. Repeat this step at least one to three more times until the seeds have sprouted tiny roots approximately 1/8 to 1/4 inch long.

While your seeds are germinating, fill your seed trays half way with organic potting soil. Spread some azomite or another trace mineral (or worm castings or whatever vegan nutrients you want) over the soil and add another layer of organic soil. Use a tray that has drainage holes in the bottom. Water the soil thoroughly so it is soaking wet; if needed mix the water down into the soil with your hands or a spade.

Once the trays are prepped, spread your germinated seeds over the top of the soil. Spread as evenly as possible. Do not push the seeds down into the soil. Cover the tray with another seed tray (make sure the cover has drainage holes to allow for air circulation) or newspaper or even some bounty paper towel.

Put your grass sprouts in an area with low lighting and a temperature of around 70 degrees F. The cooler the better but longer growing times may be needed, if it’s too hot or humid, mold will grow easily around the base of the grass stems and within the root system.

Water the grass enough to keep the soil moist but not saturated, usually once or twice a day. Using a mister type spray bottle is a great way to evenly water the grass without wetting it down to much while still incorporating plenty of fresh air. Continue misting once a day once the seed roots have buried themselves in the soil.

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Remove the tray top when the grass gets to about 1 to 2 inches tall, usually after 3 or 4

After about ten days or once the grass reaches about 7 to 8 inches, harvest as needed to juice or harvest it all and keep it in a green veggie bag in the fridge. Cut the grass right above the above the soil. The first harvest is always the most nutrient and flavor rich grass. Most people compost the soil and roots after harvesting but you can let it keep growing if you like. Two or three harvest are usually as good as it gets, any more after that and you’re just growing empty grass. days. Be sure to keep the tray in a well-lighted place and keep the soil moist.

Wheat & Barley grass Juice!!!

Once you’ve harvested your grass it’s time to get juicing! The best way to extract the vital juice from your young grass is with a wheat grass juicer like The Healthy Juicer. The Healthy Juicer is the most popular wheat grass juicer because it is compact and is one of the most inexpensive of the wheat grass juicers. This is the perfect juicer to have in addition to a regular juicer that doesn’t do leafy vegetables very well. The Healthy Juicer is portable, requires no electricity and is easily cleaned and stored without taking to much space in the cupboard. This juicer is known for being really efficient, easy to travel with and easy to clean and put together. Probably the best choice for most based on quality, price and ease of use.

Whatever reason you’ve decided to use wheat or barley grass, the benefits are numerous and your body will thank you sooner than later.

More on Wheat Grass –

Myths about Wheat Grass

Best Wheat Grass Juicers

Categories: Breakdown, Eat, Organic | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

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